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AccuWeather’s Tony Laubach is on the ground in Iowa ahead of potentially damaging storms in the Upper Midwest on June 12

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This detailed forecast examines severe weather conditions and storm tracking efforts in the Upper Midwest, explicitly focusing on regions from northern Minnesota to central Illinois.

Meteorologist Tony Laubach, a seasoned storm chaser, provides an in-depth look into the challenges and strategies in predicting and tracking these powerful weather events.

Field Operations Overview

Meteorologist Tony Laubach’s Mission

Tony Laubach, a veteran storm chaser and meteorologist, is in the field to monitor and report on the severe weather conditions affecting the Upper Midwest. Laubach’s mission involves:

  • Tracking multiple rounds of storms.
  • Assessing potential threats.
  • Providing real-time updates to ensure public safety and awareness.

His work is crucial in helping communities prepare for and respond to severe weather.

Laubach’s expertise and experience make him an invaluable asset in understanding and mitigating the impacts of severe weather. His goal is to observe and educate the public on the dangers of these storms, helping reduce injuries and fatalities.

Target Regions for Storm Tracking

The primary regions targeted by Laubach and his team include:

  • Southern Minnesota along the I-94 corridor, particularly from St. Cloud to Minneapolis, is prone to severe thunderstorms due to its location, where warm, moist air from the south meets cooler, drier air from the north.
  • Northeast Kansas: Known for its severe weather history, this region is crucial for tracking potential tornadoes and hailstorms.
  • Central Illinois: This area frequently experiences severe weather events, making it a critical location for storm tracking efforts.

These regions are strategically chosen based on their accessibility, weather patterns, and the potential severity of the storms. By focusing on these areas, Laubach and his team can maximize their efforts in monitoring and predicting severe weather.

Severe Weather Threats

The team is preparing for several types of severe weather threats:

  • Damaging Winds are the primary threat across the target areas. They can cause significant damage to structures, trees, and power lines. Wind speeds in these storms can exceed 70 mph, posing severe risks to property and life.
  • Hail: Potential for hail in various sizes, posing a risk to vehicles, crops, and property. Hailstones can reach sizes of up to 2 inches in diameter or larger, causing extensive damage to roofs, windows, and other structures.
  • Tornadoes: A limited but notable tornado threat, particularly in far northern Minnesota. While less common, tornadoes present the most significant danger due to their destructive potential.

The team’s ability to accurately predict and monitor these threats is vital for issuing timely warnings and ensuring the public can take appropriate safety measures.

Logistical Challenges

Tracking storms in northern Minnesota presents significant logistical challenges due to the limited road infrastructure. This affects the team’s ability to chase effectively and document storms in that region. The dense forests and numerous lakes can impede mobility, making it challenging to maintain a safe distance from the storms while still capturing valuable data.

Therefore, the focus is on more accessible areas where the team can safely navigate and monitor the weather conditions. In regions with better road networks, the team can quickly reposition themselves to follow storm developments and provide continuous updates.

Daily Adjustments and Strategic Focus

Radar Monitoring and Decision Making

The team relies heavily on radar data to monitor storm clusters and identify potential outflow boundaries. These boundaries are crucial for predicting where new storms might develop. By analyzing radar imagery, the team can track storm movements, intensity, and potential formation of new cells.

Daily assessments determine the best areas to target based on the latest weather forecasts and radar observations. This flexible approach allows the team to adapt to changing weather conditions and ensure they are always in the most advantageous position for storm tracking.

Timeline and Operations

The storm tracking operations are planned over several days, with a flexible approach to accommodate changing weather patterns. The team’s plans include:

  • Thursday: Focus on southern Minnesota and possibly shift towards northeast Kansas or central Illinois. This day will be crucial for setting the stage for the following days, as initial observations will help refine subsequent tracking efforts.
  • Friday: The severe weather tracking may continue, with decisions based on the evolving weather situation. The team will review data from the previous day to adjust their strategies and focus areas.

This timeline allows for continuous monitoring and adjustment, ensuring the team can respond quickly and efficiently to new developments.

Safety Measures and Coverage

Safety is a top priority for Laubach and his team. They take precautions to ensure they can capture video footage and monitor severe weather conditions without putting themselves at unnecessary risk. The team has reliable vehicles, communication tools, and emergency contingency plans.

They aim to provide comprehensive coverage while maintaining safety standards. This includes avoiding areas with poor road networks, staying informed about the latest weather updates, and being ready to evacuate if conditions become too dangerous.

Research on Severe Weather in the Upper Midwest

Historical Context

The Upper Midwest is known for its volatile weather, particularly during the spring and summer. This region frequently experiences severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, and hailstorms driven by the clash of warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and more relaxed, drier air from Canada.

Historically, this region has seen some of the most severe weather events in the United States. For example, the 1965 Palm Sunday tornado outbreak and the 1991 Halloween blizzard highlight the region’s susceptibility to extreme weather.

Current Weather Patterns

As of the latest updates, the weather patterns in the Upper Midwest are conducive to severe storm development. Factors contributing to this include:

  • High Moisture Levels: Increased atmospheric moisture, providing the necessary fuel for thunderstorms. This moisture is often brought in by southerly winds from the Gulf of Mexico, creating a humid environment ideal for storm formation.
  • Instability: Atmospheric instability leads to the rapid development of severe weather. Temperature differences between the surface and upper levels of the atmosphere typically cause this instability.
  • Wind Shear: Favorable wind shear conditions enhance the potential for tornado formation. Wind shear refers to changes in wind speed and direction with height, which can help to organize thunderstorms and create rotating updrafts necessary for tornadoes.

These factors are combined to create a high likelihood of severe weather in the targeted regions. The team must remain vigilant and ready to respond to any developments.

Predictive Models and Forecasts

Meteorologists use various predictive models to forecast severe weather. These models analyze data from satellites, weather stations, and radar to provide accurate predictions. Some of the critical models include:

  • Global Forecast System (GFS): A widely used model that forecasts up to 16 days in advance.
  • North American Mesoscale (NAM) Model: This model focuses on short-term weather forecasting and provides detailed predictions up to 84 hours ahead.
  • High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) Model: This model provides real-time data and short-term forecasts, particularly useful for predicting severe weather events.

The current models indicate a high likelihood of severe weather in the targeted regions, necessitating vigilant monitoring and preparedness. Using these models, Laubach and his team can make informed decisions about where to focus their efforts.

FAQs

Q: What are the main threats associated with the severe weather in the Upper Midwest?

A: The main threats include damaging winds, hail, and a limited risk of tornadoes, particularly in northern Minnesota. These threats can cause significant property damage, disrupt transportation, and pose severe risks to human safety.

Q: Why is northern Minnesota a challenging area for storm tracking?

A: Northern Minnesota has limited road infrastructure, making it difficult for storm chasers to navigate and monitor storms effectively. The dense forests and numerous lakes further complicate mobility and visibility.

Q: How does Tony Laubach’s team decide which areas to target for storm tracking?

A: The team uses radar data and weather forecasts to identify potential storm development areas. They also consider logistical factors such as road accessibility and safety. This strategic approach ensures they can maximize their monitoring efforts while minimizing risks.

Q: What safety measures are taken by storm chasers in the field?

A: Storm chasers prioritize their safety by staying informed about weather conditions, using reliable vehicles, and having emergency contingency plans. They avoid high-risk areas, communicate with local authorities, and are prepared to evacuate if necessary.

Q: How does radar data help in predicting severe weather?

A: Radar data provides real-time information on storm development, intensity, and movement, allowing meteorologists to identify potential threats and issue warnings. This data is crucial for tracking storm evolution and making timely predictions.

Q: What is the significance of outflow boundaries in storm tracking?

A: Outflow boundaries, created by a storm’s downdraft, can trigger the development of new storms. Identifying these boundaries helps in predicting where severe weather might occur. These boundaries act as mini cold fronts, lifting warm, moist air and creating new storm cells.

Q: How do daily weather assessments influence storm tracking plans?

A: Daily assessments allow the team to adjust their plans based on the latest weather developments, ensuring they target the most promising areas for storm activity. This flexibility is critical to staying ahead of rapidly changing weather conditions.

Q: What role does wind shear play in the formation of tornadoes?

A: Wind shear, or changes in wind speed and direction with height, creates the necessary conditions for tornado formation by promoting the rotation of thunderstorms. Strong wind shear can help organize thunderstorms into supercells capable of producing tornadoes.

Q: Why is capturing video footage of storms significant for meteorologists?

A: Video footage provides valuable data for analyzing storm behavior, validating predictive models, and educating the public about severe weather. Visual evidence helps in understanding storm dynamics and improving future forecasts.

Q: How long will the current storm tracking operations continue?

A: The operations are planned over the next few days, with potential adjustments based on the evolving weather. The team will continue monitoring until the severe weather threat diminishes. Their commitment to tracking ensures they provide continuous updates and valuable insights into the storm activity.

Chasing Storms as They Erupt in the Upper Midwest

In this segment, meteorologist Tony Laubach discusses the severe weather conditions and storm tracking efforts in the Upper Midwest, focusing on northern Minnesota and central Illinois regions. This expansion provides a comprehensive analysis of the ongoing weather situation, the strategies employed by the meteorologists, and the key challenges they face in tracking and predicting severe weather.

Field Operations Overview

Meteorologist Tony Laubach’s Mission

Tony Laubach, a seasoned storm chaser and meteorologist, monitors and reports the severe weather conditions affecting the Upper Midwest. His mission involves:

  • Tracking multiple rounds of storms.
  • Assessing potential threats.
  • Providing real-time updates to ensure public safety and awareness.

Target Regions for Storm Tracking

The primary regions targeted by Laubach and his team include:

  • Southern Minnesota along the I-94 corridor, particularly from St. Cloud to Minneapolis.
  • Northeast Kansas.
  • Central Illinois.

These areas are strategically chosen based on their accessibility, weather patterns, and the potential severity of the storms.

Severe Weather Threats

The team is preparing for several types of severe weather threats:

  • Damaging Winds: The primary threat across the target areas, capable of causing significant damage to structures, trees, and power lines.
  • Hail: Potential for hail in various sizes, posing a risk to vehicles, crops, and property.
  • Tornadoes: A limited but notable tornado threat, particularly in far northern Minnesota.

Logistical Challenges

Tracking storms in northern Minnesota presents significant logistical challenges due to the limited road infrastructure. This affects the team’s ability to chase effectively and document storms in that region. Therefore, the focus is on more accessible areas where the team can safely navigate and monitor the weather conditions.

Daily Adjustments and Strategic Focus

Radar Monitoring and Decision Making

The team relies heavily on radar data to monitor storm clusters and identify potential outflow boundaries. These boundaries are crucial for predicting where new storms might develop. Daily assessments determine the best areas to target based on the latest weather forecasts and radar observations.

Timeline and Operations

The storm tracking operations are planned over several days, with a flexible approach to accommodate changing weather patterns. The team’s plans include:

  • Thursday: Focus on southern Minnesota and possibly shift towards northeast Kansas or central Illinois.
  • Friday: Potential continuation of severe weather tracking, with decisions based on the evolving weather situation.

Safety Measures and Coverage

Laubach and his team prioritize safety. They take precautions to ensure they can capture video footage and monitor severe weather conditions without putting themselves at unnecessary risk. The aim is to provide comprehensive coverage while maintaining safety standards.

Research on Severe Weather in the Upper Midwest

Historical Context

The Upper Midwest is known for its volatile weather, particularly during the spring and summer. This region frequently experiences severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, and hailstorms driven by the clash of warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and more relaxed, drier air from Canada.

Current Weather Patterns

As of the latest updates, the weather patterns in the Upper Midwest are conducive to severe storm development. Factors contributing to this include:

  • High Moisture Levels: Increased atmospheric moisture, providing the necessary fuel for thunderstorms.
  • Instability: Atmospheric instability leads to the rapid development of severe weather.
  • Wind Shear: Favorable wind shear conditions enhance the potential for tornado formation.

Predictive Models and Forecasts

Meteorologists use various predictive models to forecast severe weather. These models analyze data from satellites, weather stations, and radar to provide accurate predictions. The current models indicate a high likelihood of severe weather in the targeted regions, necessitating vigilant monitoring and preparedness.

FAQs

Q: What are the main threats associated with the severe weather in the Upper Midwest?

A: The main threats include damaging winds, hail, and a limited risk of tornadoes, particularly in northern Minnesota.

Q: Why is northern Minnesota a challenging area for storm tracking?

A: Northern Minnesota has limited road infrastructure, making it difficult for storm chasers to navigate and monitor storms effectively.

Q: How does Tony Laubach’s team decide which areas to target for storm tracking?

A: The team uses radar data and weather forecasts to identify potential storm development areas. They also consider logistical factors such as road accessibility and safety.

Q: What safety measures are taken by storm chasers in the field?

A: Storm chasers prioritize their safety by staying informed about weather conditions, using reliable vehicles, and having emergency contingency plans.

Q: How does radar data help in predicting severe weather?

A: Radar data provides real-time information on storm development, intensity, and movement, allowing meteorologists to identify potential threats and issue warnings.

Q: What is the significance of outflow boundaries in storm tracking?

A: Outflow boundaries, created by a storm’s downdraft, can trigger the development of new storms. Identifying these boundaries helps predict where severe weather might occur.

Q: How do daily weather assessments influence storm tracking plans?

A: Daily assessments allow the team to adjust their plans based on the latest weather developments, ensuring they target the most promising areas for storm activity.

Q: What role does wind shear play in the formation of tornadoes?

A: Wind shear, or changes in wind speed and direction with height, creates the necessary conditions for tornado formation by promoting the rotation of thunderstorms.

Q: Why is capturing video footage of storms significant for meteorologists?

A: Video footage provides valuable data for analyzing storm behavior, validating predictive models, and educating the public about severe weather.

Q: How long will the current storm tracking operations continue?

A: The operations are planned over the next few days, with potential adjustments based on the evolving weather. The team will continue monitoring until the severe weather threat diminishes.

Chasing Storms as They Erupt in the Upper Midwest

SEO Meta Description: Discover the challenges and strategies of tracking severe weather in the Upper Midwest, featuring insights from seasoned storm chaser Tony Laubach.

Outline

HeadingSubtopics

Chasing Storms as They Erupt in the Upper Midwest 

Introduction Overview of Storm Chasing in the Upper Midwest

The Role of Storm Chasers: Importance of storm chasers in severe weather monitoring

Tony Laubach’s Mission Insights into Laubach’s storm chasing efforts

Target Regions for Storm Tracking Key areas in the Upper Midwest prone to severe weather

Understanding Severe Weather Threats Types of severe weather and their impacts

Logistical Challenges in Storm Tracking Difficulties faced in northern Minnesota and other regions

Daily Operations and Strategic Focus: How the team plans and adapts its tracking efforts

Radar Monitoring and Decision Making The Role of radar in predicting and tracking storms

Timeline and Operations Planned schedule for storm tracking activities

Safety Measures in Storm Chasing Precautions taken to ensure safety during storm chasing

Historical Context of Severe Weather in the Upper Midwest Notable severe weather events in history

Current Weather Patterns Analysis of present weather conditions conducive to storm development

Predictive Models and Forecasts Tools and models used for weather prediction

Meteorologist Tony Laubach: A Closer Look Background and Expertise of Tony Laubach

Technological Tools in Storm Tracking Equipment and technology used in the field

Impact of Severe Weather on Communities How severe weather affects local populations

Emergency Response and Preparedness Steps taken by communities to prepare for severe weather

Education and Public Awareness: Role of storm chasers in educating the public

Case Studies of Successful Storm Tracking Examples of effective storm tracking missions

Future of Storm Chasing Emerging trends and technologies in storm-chasing

FAQs Common questions about storm tracking and severe weather

Conclusion Summary of key points and the importance of storm tracking

Introduction

Tracking storms in the Upper Midwest, notorious for severe weather, is daunting yet crucial. From northern Minnesota to central Illinois, storm chasers like Tony Laubach focus on monitoring and predicting these powerful weather events. This article delves into the complexities of storm chasing in this region, offering insights into the strategies and challenges meteorologists face in their mission to keep the public safe.

The Role of Storm Chasers

Storm chasers play a vital role in severe weather monitoring. They provide real-time data and insights critical for issuing timely warnings and preparing communities for impending threats. Tracking storms up close helps improve the accuracy of weather forecasts and contributes to our understanding of severe weather patterns.

Tony Laubach’s Mission

Tony Laubach, a seasoned storm chaser and meteorologist, is committed to tracking and reporting severe weather conditions in the Upper Midwest. His mission involves:

  • Monitoring multiple rounds of storms.
  • Assessing potential threats.
  • Providing real-time updates to ensure public safety.Laubach’s

His extensive experience and expertise make him a key figure in storm chasing. He aims to observe and educate the public on the dangers of severe weather.

Target Regions for Storm Tracking

Laubach and his team focus on several critical areas in the Upper Midwest:

  • Southern Minnesota along the I-94 corridor (St. Cloud to Minneapolis): This region is prone to severe thunderstorms due to its location, where warm, moist air from the south meets more relaxed, drier air from the north.
  • Northeast Kansas: Known for its history of severe weather, this area is a hotspot for tornadoes and hailstorms.
  • Central Illinois: Frequently experiences severe weather events, making it a critical area for tracking efforts.

These regions are strategically selected based on their accessibility, weather patterns, and the potential severity of storms. By focusing on these areas, Laubach and his team can maximize their effectiveness in monitoring and predicting severe weather.

Understanding Severe Weather Threats

The team prepares for various types of severe weather threats, including:

  • Damaging Winds: Capable of causing significant damage to structures, trees, and power lines, with wind speeds exceeding 70 mph.
  • Hail: Potential for large hailstones that can damage vehicles, crops, and property.
  • Tornadoes: Though less common, tornadoes present a significant danger due to their destructive potential.

Accurate prediction and monitoring of these threats are vital for issuing timely warnings and ensuring public safety.

Logistical Challenges in Storm Tracking

Tracking storms in northern Minnesota presents significant logistical challenges due to the limited road infrastructure. Dense forests and numerous lakes can impede mobility and visibility, making it difficult for storm chasers to navigate safely. Therefore, the team often focuses on more accessible areas where they can effectively monitor and document severe weather conditions.

Daily Operations and Strategic Focus

Radar Monitoring and Decision Making

The team relies heavily on radar data to monitor storm clusters and identify potential outflow boundaries. These boundaries are critical for predicting where new storms might develop. By analyzing radar imagery, the team can track storm movements, intensity, and potential formation of new cells.

Timeline and Operations

The storm tracking operations are planned over several days, with flexibility to adapt to changing weather patterns:

  • Thursday: Focus on southern Minnesota and possibly shift towards northeast Kansas or central Illinois.
  • Friday: Continue severe weather tracking based on evolving conditions, with strategy adjustments as necessary.

This flexible approach allows the team to stay ahead of rapidly changing weather conditions and ensures they are always in the best position to track storms.

Safety Measures in Storm Chasing

Safety is a top priority for Laubach and his team. They take various precautions to capture valuable data without putting themselves at unnecessary risk. This includes using reliable vehicles, maintaining communication with local authorities, and having contingency plans for emergencies.

Historical Context of Severe Weather in the Upper Midwest

The Upper Midwest has a history of severe weather, particularly during the spring and summer months. Notable events include the 1965 Palm Sunday tornado outbreak and the 1991 Halloween blizzard, highlighting the region’s susceptibility to extreme weather. These historical events underscore the importance of ongoing storm-tracking efforts to mitigate future risks.

Current Weather Patterns

As of the latest updates, the weather patterns in the Upper Midwest are conducive to severe storm development, driven by:

  • High Moisture Levels: Increased atmospheric moisture fuels thunderstorms.
  • Instability: Temperature differences between the surface and upper levels of the atmosphere create instability.
  • Wind Shear: Changes in wind speed and direction with height enhance the potential for tornado formation.

These factors create a high likelihood of severe weather in the targeted regions, necessitating vigilant monitoring and preparedness.

Predictive Models and Forecasts

Meteorologists use various predictive models to forecast severe weather, including:

  • Global Forecast System (GFS): Provides forecasts up to 16 days in advance.
  • North American Mesoscale (NAM) Model: Offers detailed short-term predictions up to 84 hours ahead.
  • High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) Model: This model provides real-time data and short-term forecasts, especially useful for severe weather events.

These models indicate a high likelihood of severe weather in the targeted regions, guiding Laubach and his team’s efforts.

Meteorologist Tony Laubach: A Closer Look

Tony Laubach’s meteorology background and extensive field experience make him an expert in storm tracking. His commitment to public safety and education sets him apart in the field, as he not only tracks storms but also works to inform and protect communities.

Technological Tools in Storm Tracking

Laubach’s team utilizes a range of technological tools in their storm-tracking efforts, including:

  • Doppler Radar: Provides detailed information on storm structure and movement.
  • Satellite Imagery: Offers a broad view of weather patterns and developments.
  • Mobile Weather Stations: Collect real-time temperature, humidity, and wind speed data.

These tools are essential for accurate storm tracking and prediction.

Impact of Severe Weather on Communities

Severe weather can have devastating impacts on communities, including:

  • Property Damage: High winds, hail, and tornadoes can cause significant destruction.
  • Disruption of Services: Power outages, road closures, and communication breakdowns.
  • Economic Losses: Damage to crops, businesses, and infrastructure.

Understanding these impacts underscores the importance of effective storm tracking and preparedness.

Emergency Response and Preparedness

Communities in the Upper Midwest take various steps to prepare for severe weather, including:

  • Emergency Plans: Developing and practicing emergency response plans.
  • Public Awareness Campaigns: Educating the public on severe weather risks and safety measures.
  • Early Warning Systems: Implementing systems to provide timely alerts and updates.

These measures are crucial for minimizing the impact of severe weather.

Education and Public Awareness

Storm chasers like Laubach are crucial in educating the public about severe weather. Sharing their experiences and knowledge, they help people understand the risks and take appropriate precautions. Public awareness is vital for reducing injuries and fatalities during severe weather events.

Case Studies of Successful Storm Tracking

Example 1: Southern Minnesota Hailstorm

In a recent tracking mission, Laubach’s team successfully predicted and monitored a severe hailstorm in southern Minnesota. Their timely updates and warnings helped local authorities prepare and protect the community, minimizing damage and injuries.

Example 2: Central Illinois Tornado

Laubach’s team tracked a developing tornado in central Illinois, providing real-time updates that enabled timely evacuation and emergency response. Their efforts were instrumental in preventing casualties and reducing property damage.

Future of Storm Chasing

Storm chasing continuously evolves, with new technologies and methods enhancing our ability to predict and monitor severe weather. Emerging trends include:

  • Drone Technology: Drones provide aerial views and access to hard-to-reach areas.
  • Artificial Intelligence: AI improves predictive models and data analysis.
  • Enhanced Communication Tools: Improved communication between storm chasers and emergency services.

These advancements promise to make storm chasing more effective and safer.

FAQs

What are the main threats associated with the severe weather in the Upper Midwest?

The main threats include damaging winds, hail, and a limited risk of tornadoes, particularly in northern Minnesota. These threats can cause significant property damage, disrupt transportation, and pose severe risks to human safety.

Why is northern Minnesota a challenging area for storm tracking?

Northern Minnesota has limited road infrastructure, making it difficult for storm chasers to navigate and monitor storms effectively. The dense forests and numerous lakes further complicate mobility and visibility.

How does Tony Laubach’s team decide which areas to target for storm tracking?

The team uses radar data and weather forecasts to identify potential storm development areas. They also consider logistical factors such as road accessibility and safety. This strategic approach ensures they can maximize their monitoring efforts while minimizing risks.

What safety measures are taken by storm chasers in the field?

Storm chasers prioritize their safety by staying informed about weather conditions, using reliable vehicles, and having emergency contingency plans. They avoid high-risk areas, communicate with local authorities, and are prepared to evacuate if necessary.

How does radar data help in predicting severe weather?

Radar data provides real-time information on storm development, intensity, and movement, allowing meteorologists to identify potential threats and issue warnings. This data is crucial for tracking storm evolution and making timely predictions.

What is the significance of outflow boundaries in storm tracking?

Outflow boundaries, created by a storm’s downdraft, can trigger the development of new storms. Identifying these boundaries helps in predicting where severe weather might occur. These boundaries act as mini cold fronts, lifting warm, moist air and creating new storm cells.

In conclusion, storm tracking in the Upper Midwest is complex and challenging. With the expertise of meteorologists like Tony Laubach, the public can stay informed and prepared for severe weather events. By understanding the threats, logistical challenges, and predictive tools involved, we gain a deeper appreciation for the efforts to keep communities safe in the face of nature’s fury.

From:
Date: June 12, 2024
People: Tony Laubach
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